Go7Gaming Zomb-Base-001 Storage Insert Kit for Zombicide Review

Recently I was given the opportunity to check out a new product from Go7Gaming. That product was the Zomb-Base-001 Storage Insert Kit for Zombicide or Zombicide Rue Morgue. I received it in a flat rate shipping box. Inside I found a bundle of wooden sheets wrapped together in a large ziplock bag with some full color instructions explaining how to put everything together. After removing the sheets from the packaging and reading through the instructions, it was ready to assemble.

Now then, let me explain exactly what this product is and what it does. First off, this is an insert for the game Zombicide but it will also work with Zombicide Rue Morgue. Once it’s been assembled, the insert makes it possible to keep all of the different survior, zombivor and zombie miniatures separated, as well as all of the cards and tokens that come with the game. There’s even room for individual survivors and other extras that you can purchase separately. For me, I’ve added the Toxic City Mall expansion, some extra survivors and zombivors and a few extra zombies. The insert looks really great when it’s finished. It even comes with some tags so that you can label each section for what’s inside. Of course you’ll be able to see a bit more about that a little later. At this time, let’s go ahead and cover what all you get and the basic instruction on how to assemble this insert. We’ll start off by separating out all the different wooden sheets. As you can see, there’s a lot of sheets of wood to be assembled. Each piece is cut so that you can easily punch them out from the main sheet that they’re attached to.

If you’ve ever read one of my reviews for Go7Gaming inserts, you’ll already know that glue is your best friend when building these things. It’s not an absolute necessity as you can use other things like tape, but it’s definitely the best option. With this review I won’t be telling you each time when to add glue to your pieces. Just be aware that if there are 2 pieces being put together, you’ll want to apply glue between them both. With that said, let’s begin the assembling process starting with the tile and miniatures storage tray.

To build the tile and miniatures storage tray, you’ll start by placing the large inner lane divider into the base, followed by the small inner lane divider. Next you’ll connect the two tab end of end splitters to the base. One will also connect to the large inner lane divider and the other one will connect to the small inner lane divider. You’ll then need to attach the two long outer walls to the inner lane dividers on either side. After those are on, you’ll place the short wall onto the base connecting it to the two long outer walls you just attached. Next place the short minis wall onto the base connecting it to the long outer walls. You’ll then place all your dividers in whatever way you see fit. I went with the traditional layout. When you’re finished, it should look something like this.

Next up, well construct the token storage tray. First we’ll connect the center divider to the base. Next attach the long wall to the base and the center divider, repeating the process for the other long wall. You’ll then want to attach the two end walls on either side. Once you’ve gotten that finished, you can add dividers as needed. Once again, I went with the traditional layout. When you’re finished, it should look something like this.

The next thing we’ll assemble is the 2 large miniatures storage trays. First off we’ll connect the center divider to the base. Next we’ll attach the long wall without the tag holes to the base and divider. We will then need to attach the long wall with the tag holes for the other side. We then will need to attach the two end walls, connecting them to the base and the long walls. Once you’re finished, you can assemble the second of these in the exact same way. Afterwards you can place dividers as needed, you can even place a cross divider to split the sections into smaller spaces if desired. I left them open to begin with and didn’t add any dividers until I figured out what I wanted to place in each space. You’ll see more on that in a bit. When you’re finished with these, you should have something that looks kind of like this.

Now we’ll construct the small bit tray. To assemble it you’ll need to attach the long wall to the base, followed by connecting the short wall. You’ll then attach the other long wall followed by the other short wall. When you’re finished, it should look something like this.

Our next project is the two small storage trays. Attach the long side wall to the base, followed by the end wall. Now you’ll attach the other long wall with the tag holes on it, connecting it to the base and the end wall. We’ll then connect the other end wall and connect everything together. After you’re finished you can place a divider into the tray to keep things the right distance apart. I left these open to begin with as well. Later on you’ll see exactly how I placed everything. Once you’ve finished with one, you can build the other one the exact same way. When you’re finished, they should look something like this.

Finally, we’ll construct the small card storage tray. This one’s a little different. You’ll start by taking the inner base and attaching the long side wall to it. You’ll then do this for the other side too. Just be aware that there should be a space below the inner base if you sit it down on the table. You will then connect the short divider wall to the front of the inner base. Next you’ll connect the longer divider wall. This one has the word WOUND etched on it. You’ll see exactly how it looks in just a minute. You’ll then attach the lower base and connect it to the four walls. Afterwards you can place the corresponding dividers inside for Zombie and Equipment cards. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

Now that you’re finished, you just need to wait for everything to dry overnight. Once it has, you can place dividers as you see fit and place the different pieces and parts of the game inside the insert. As I mentioned earlier, I placed both the base Zombicide game and the Toxic City Mall expansion inside this, as well as extra Survivors, Zombivors and extra zombies. I then placed the etched tags as I saw fit into the different trays to identify what was in each one. Of course your setup may look a bit different compared to mine. I took a look at the pictures on the website and placed things where it made the best possible sense for what I have for the game, using the website as a guide. Here’s what I ended up with.

 

MATERIALS
At this point, I would normally explain how the different components of the game look. However since this is an organizer and not a game, I’ll describe the packing and insert instead. Everything came prepackaged in a flat rate shipping box. Everything was placed inside a large zip lock style bag with all the wooden pieces shrink wrapped together. Everything looked very nice and there were no problems with anything. The wooden sheets are nice and thick and are very easy to puch out the different pieces. If you decided to use glue or tape, you’ll need to supply your own as the organizer does not come with any included. Assembling the product was fairly simple, however it did take awhile to finish. Overall the materials look great and everything is strong and durable. I’m very pleased with every aspect of the materials.
9 out of 10

INSTRUCTION
At this time, I would normally be explaining the rulebook of the game. Instead, I’ll cover the instructions that came with the insert. The instructions came on two sheets of double sided paper. There was a detailed process that walks you through each step of assembling the insert. There are plenty of pictures to help you see exactly what piece goes where when assembling. Everything is explained very well and I didn’t find it difficult to figure out at all. Everything is well written and looks good. I even like the joke at the end stating that I’ve now gained a +1 to my Dexterity and a +2 to my Crafting ability. Hilarious! Overall, I’m very pleased with the instructions and found them to be extremely helpful.
9 out of 10

CONSTRUCTION
For this section, I normally would be explaining how the game played and my thoughts and feelings on it. However since this is a product review, I’ll give my thoughts on the assembly process as well as anything that I feel is important to note. Putting the insert together took awhile to complete. There were lots of different trays and such that had to be assembled, as you can tell from the pictures above. I’ve mentioned this several times before but for those not familiar with Go7Gaming’s inserts, they tend to be a bit looser than normal inserts. It’s for that reason that I usually recommend glue or tape to hold everything together with, or both. Once I finished putting everything together I had to check the website to see what pieces went where. The instructions were a bit vague on that aspect of the process. Even with the pictures I was still a bit unsure. That’s why I simply went with what worked for me. Which is probably the best thing to do anyway. The pictures on the website did help and it got me pointed in the right direction anyway. I’ve mentioned several times that I included the Toxic City Mall expansion into this box. The only thing that I had problems with was finding a way to get the large rubble tokens into the box. It actually took me a bit but I finally went with just placing them on top of the rulebooks. I had also left out the large tiles from Toxic City Mall and had placed the survivor cards on top of the original game tiles. I have since went back and placed the large tiles together in the tray. It does lift the lid a little bit, but that’s fine. I now have the survivor ID cards on top of the insert below the rulebooks. Before there was no problem with the lid closing. It all fit down properly. Now there’s a little bit of lift on the lid, but not enough to matter. I’m actually fine with it. The box is quite a bit heavier with the inclusion of the insert. However it does make it a bit more structurally sound too. So there’s that benefit. I’ll say that the trays are great. They make things alot easier to get set up and a lot quicker too. I was a bit concerned that I wouldn’t be able to get everything I had into this one box, but I did it and I’m happy with the results. I love the tags to tell whats in each tray too. Those are great. I placed all the zombies of like kind together and placed my survivors and zombivors in separate sections of the trays too. I had gotten some of the VIP zombies as well which I placed in the same tray as the Abominations since they were easy to tell apart. I just wanted to keep them separate so they wouldn’t get all mixed up with everything else. The cards are a bit tight with everything I have and I will most likely separate them a bit into one of the other trays, but for now it works. In any event, I’m very happy with the overall look and feel of the insert. It does a great job of keeping everything separated and yet together at the same time. I would highly recommend this to anyone that owns either the base game or the Rue Morgue version. As you can tell, it’s got plenty of room to add other things to the box, so you don’t have to have separate boxes for everything. That’s a big bonus in my book. This is a great insert and I’m thankful that I have it.
9 out of 10

OVERALL
The Go7Gaming Zomb-Base-001 Storage Insert Kit for Zombicide or Zombicide Rue Morgue is a great way to get your game organized. It has enough room for all the pieces of the base game or Rue Morgue, as well as adding one of the smaller expansions and extra zombies or survivors. Assembling everything was fairly easy. I didn’t have too many problems. It just took awhile to complete. The instructions are very thorough and are fairly simple to follow. The insert is really great for keeping everything inside one box. It provides plenty of room for either game and for some extras too. Overall I’m very happy with how nice it looks and how well it fits everything inside the box. I highly recommend this insert. It get’s the job done in style. It’s a definite improvement to my game. You’ll be happy with this and with the amazing service from the people at Go7Gaming. Guaranteed.
9 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great products, please check out Go7Gaming at their site.

http://go7gaming.com/

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Flip City Review

Flip City is a game by Chih-Fan Chen, published by Tasty Minstrel Games. It is for 1-4 players. In this game, players will be tasked with the job of building and improving their own city. However they’ll have to be careful as too much construction will make the citizens of their town very unhappy. In the end the player that can build the best town and score enough points during their turn will be declared the winner.

To begin, each player will be given a deck of cards consisting of 4 Residential Areas, a Convenience Store, a Factory, an Apartment, a Hospital and a Central Park. Players shuffle their cards together with these named sides of the cards face up. This forms their starting deck. It should be noted that since these cards are double sided, the player should shuffle their cards beneath the table or in a way that they can’t determine what the top card of their deck is. The general supply decks are then formed and placed in the middle of the play area in separate stacks. These stacks consist of 12 Convenience Stores, 10 Offices, 12 Hospitals, 8 Factories and 8 Central Parks. The cards should be placed with these sides face up in the stack. The Office cards are actually used as an expansion and are optional. Any remaining cards should be returned to the box. The first player is chosen and play now begins.

The game is played through a series of turns. Each player will take their turn consisting of two phases; play cards phase and building phase. The first phase is the play cards phase. In this phase, the player will play cards one at a time from the top of their deck onto the table in front of themself. Each time a card is played, the player checks it for any additional rules or effects. Once a card has been played, the player has the option of playing another card from their deck or stopping and moving on to the building phase. Once the player’s deck runs out of cards, they have the option of stopping and moving to the building phase or shuffling their discard pile and creating a new deck. It should be noted that once the deck is shuffled, the player again has the option to stop or play more cards. During the player’s turn, if they receive 3 or more unhappiness from the cards that they played during this phase, the player’s turn ends immediately. Any cards that were played are then placed into the player’s discard pile. It should be noted that during this phase if a player has any cards in their discard pile that have the recycle symbol on them, they’re allowed to use the cards ability to flip it over and gain the effect or resource that it provides. This may be done at any time during this phase.

The next phase is the building phase. In this phase, the player is allowed to take 1 of 3 different actions using the cash that they gained from the previous phase. The 3 actions are buy, flip and develop. To buy, the player simply chooses a card from the supply and pays it’s cost. The card is then placed in the player’s discard pile. To flip, the player chooses a card in their discard pile and pays it’s flip fee. The card is then flipped over to the other side and remains in the player’s discard pile. To develop, the player chooses a card in the supply and then pays the card’s cost and it’s flip fee. The card is then placed in their discard pile with it’s back side up. Once a player has completed their action, they check to see if they have satisfied one of the victory conditions. If not, their turn ends and the cards that they played are placed into their discard pile. Play then passes to the next player in turn order.

The game continues until either a player gains 8 points during their play cards phase or they satisfy the victory condition of the Convenience Store card. If a player fulfills either of these conditions, they win.

COMPONENTS
This game consists of a deck of 86 cards. The artwork on each one is very nice. It has a very cartoonish look and feel to each building. It kind of makes me think of an older version of the SimCity computer game or the card game Machi Koro. I like the design and how there’s plenty of artwork without the text of the card getting in the way. Each of these has a satin like finish to them and is very good quality. I like how easy they shuffle without sticking together. They’re just the right thickness and look great on the table. The iconography isn’t too overwhelming and with a couple of times playing the game, it’s easy to remember what each icon does. Overall I like the look and feel of the cards. They’re very good.
8 out of 10

RULEBOOK
The rulebook for this game is a huge double sided paper that folds up small enough to fit inside the box. It’s a little bit thicker than normal paper and has a nice finish to it. There are lots of pictures on both sides of the paper. There’s a great overview of the components with pictures, as well as how each player’s deck should be set up and also how the general supply should look. The back side of the paper actually goes through the different phases of the game and also includes a breakdown of a card. It also explains all the different icons on the cards. I will say though that I kind of wish there had been a reference card with all the card icons on it or a way of being able to reference those icons a little better. It would have helped out in the first couple of games. The rules also have a section devoted to frequently asked questions for a little bit of clarity. The rules also include a solo variant for playing by yourself. I really like that this was included as I do like to play games solo from time to time. Overall I think the rules do a fairly good job of explaining everything. For the most part I’m pleased with the overall look and feel.
8 out of 10

GAMEPLAY
This is a fun game that doesn’t take up a ton of room. With it only being a couple stacks of cards, it’s fairly easy to take with you and play almost anywhere. It’s not a secret that I like deck building games. This one refers to itself as a microdeckbuilder. Not sure what that is, but if it means that it only has a small amount of cards to play with, then I get it. I have to say that I like the idea of flipping the cards to get better buildings to be able to do better stuff with. I like that there are plenty of choices to make such as when to stop playing cards from your deck. It’s a bit more than just I create this many points so I can now fight this card or buy this card. I also like that there’s a negative aspect of the game in the unhappiness of the city residents. If you get too much of that, you’re turn’s over and you discard all that you’ve played. It kind of gives you a push your luck feel in that way. It’s not a difficult game but the icons can take a bit of getting used to, at least for the first few times you play it. It’s definitely a unique take on deck building that I wasn’t sure if I would like or not. However I actually like it. I especially like playing it solo. Solo is more about making sure that the supply doesn’t run out before you’re able to fulfill one of the victory conditions. The thing is that each time you shuffle your deck you have to remove a card from the supply. This not only limits what you can buy but it also puts a timer on the game. This is a great little challenge and it scratches my deck building itch as well as my city building itch. I like it just fine with others but solo is my favorite way to play this. Overall fans of deck building games or card games like Machi Koro might enjoy this one. It’s a great game that is fun for the whole family or for just playing by yourself. I would recommend it.
8 out of 10

OVERALL
Flip City is a microdeckbuilding card game that can be played with the whole family or enjoyed solo. It’s a fairly fast game. Most game sessions last around 35-40 minutes. Solo play is usually a bit faster. The artwork is really fun and light. It makes me think of Machi Koro or the older versions of SimCity on the computer. This is a very unique take on the deck building mechanic that I quite like. It gives plenty of choices without being too complex. The iconography does take a bit of getting used to for the first couple of games. I wish that there had been a reference card to help with this. It’s a fun game to play with others and it’s very portable so that it can be played almost anywhere. However I prefer to play this one solo. It’s a nice challenge without taking up too much time. Plus it scratches my deck building and my city building itches. Overall this is a great card game that I look forward to spending more time with. This is one that I’d recommend, especially for those fans of deck building games or those that enjoy a good solo game. Forget Flip this House, let’s Flip this City!
8 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great games, please check out Tasty Minstrel Games at their site.

 http://playtmg.com

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Go7Gaming MASM-001 Insert Kit for Masmorra: Dungeons of Arcadia Review

Recently I was given the opportunity to check out a new product from Go7Gaming. That product was the MASM-001 Insert Kit for Masmorra: Dungeons of Arcadia. I received it in a flat rate shipping box. Inside I found a bundle of wooden sheets wrapped together in a large ziplock bag with some full color instructions explaining how to put everything together. After removing the sheets from the packaging and reading through the instructions, it was ready to assemble.

Now then, let me explain exactly what this product is and what it does. First off, this is an insert for the game Masmorra: Dungeons of Arcadia, or simply Masmorra as most people refer to it. Once it’s been assembled, the insert will make it possible to keep all of the many different miniatures, cards and other pieces of the game organized in a nice and neat way. There’s even room for all of the extra add ons and stretch goals that were included with the Kickstarter campaign as either stretch goals or add on purchases. The insert looks amazing and does a great job of fitting everything inside the box. More on that later, for now let’s take a look at everything you get and the basic instruction on how to assemble this insert. We’ll start off by separating out all the different wooden sheets. As you can probably see, there’s quite a lot of sheets. Each piece is cut so that you can easily punch them out from the main sheet that they’re attached to.

If you’ve read any of my reviews for Go7Gaming inserts, you’ll already know what I’m about to say. For new readers, here’s the skinny…you will want to have some glue to attach the various pieces of this kit together with. It’s not completely necessary, as you can use other things like tape or the like. However, to really keep everything together properly, you’ll want to use glue. In this review I won’t be stopping every time to tell you when to use glue. Just know that if there are 2 pieces being joined together, you’ll want to apply glue between them both. With that said, let’s begin the assembling process starting with the token storage tray.

To build the token storage tray, you’ll start by connecting the inner wall to the short outer wall and then connecting these two to the base plate. Next you’ll need to connect the long outer wall to the base and the tabs of the inner wall. Afterwards, you’ll need to connect the short end wall, the short side wall and the long end wall. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

The next thing that you’ll want to build is the player aid storage tray. To build it, you’ll want to attach the long side wall to the base, followed by attaching the two end side tabs on either side. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

Now you’re ready to assemble the hero board storage tray. Make sure that you pop out the middle piece of the base first. What you’ll want to do then is to attach the long wall and the two end side walls to the base. Finally you’ll attach the other long wall to the base connecting everything together. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

The next thing to build is the medium tile storage tray. Simply pop out the middle piece from this base and the two side walls as well. Now you’ll need to attach the end wall to the two side walls that you punched out the pieces from, and onto the base. Finally you’ll add the last end wall to the base and connect it to the side walls. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

Now we’ll tackle the dice storage tray. First off you’ll attach the center divider wall to the base. From there, we’ll add the two end walls that connect to the center divider to the base. Finally we’ll add on the two slotted divider walls to either side, attaching them to the end walls and the base. It won’t hurt if once you’re gotten everything together, you place a divider or two in each of the dice lanes to keep everything at the right distance. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

Our next project is the card storage tray. Simply attach one of the slotted side walls to the curved end wall, connect them to the base. Next attach the other slotted side wall to the base and end wall. Finally attach the other curved end wall to the base and slotted side walls. You may want to place a divider or two to keep the distance correct. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

This time, we’ll have to construct something a little more complicated, the deep miniatures storage tray. You’ll need to prepare the wide and slim rail assemblies for attaching to the supports. These will be placed on the inside of the tray. You’ll need two slim assemblies on either end of both of the side walls, as well as three wide assemblies for the middle of each one. These will need to be attached to the side walls. This will need to be done for both of the side walls. Once that’s completed, you’ll attach the side wall to one of the end walls and attach it to the base. Oh and don’t forget to punch out the handles for the end walls. Now you’ll attach the other side wall to the base, finishing it up by adding the other end wall. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

We’re getting close to the end, so let’s put the small tile storage tray together now. First you’ll need to connect the two center walls to the divider wall. You’ll then connect these pieces to the base. This is a bit tricky. Once that’s done you’ll need to attach the two side walls connecting them to the base and divider wall. Do this for both sides. We’ll now attach the low wall to the base and the side walls. Finally we’ll add the finishing touches to this tray by attaching the two short walls to the front of the two side walls and then connecting the center walls to the center end wall. This will keep the tiles from falling out. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

Finally we’ll assemble the final pieces to make the shallow miniatures storage tray. We’ll start by attaching the two center divider walls to the base. Next we’ll attach the two end walls to the base and the center divider walls. We will then attach the outer divider walls to the base and the two end walls. This will be done for both sides. Finally we connect the two cross divider walls to the assembly going from the end wall through the two center divider walls and attaching on the other end wall for each one. When you’re finished it should look something like this.

At this point, it’s simply a matter of waiting for everything to dry overnight. Once that’s done, you can start putting all the pieces inside. What you’ll end up with will be something kind of like this. Of course I only have the base game and Kickstarter extras. I don’t have the add ons or anything extra apart from those. So you’re finished product may look a little different than mine in terms of where everything is put in the trays. I placed everything where it made sense and it fit relying on the pictures and storage key to help me out as best as possible. This is what I ended up with.

 

MATERIALS
At this point of the review, I would normall give you an inside look at all the different components that come with the game. Since this is an organizer and not an actual game, I’ll describe the packaging and insert itself. Everything came prepackaged in a flat rate shipping box. It was contained inside a large zip lock style bag with all the wooden pieces shrink wrapped together. Everything look very nice and there were no issues. The wooden sheets were nice and thick. Punching out the pieces was very easy. It was a bit challenging to figure out which sheets went with which organizer since there were so many sheets of wood to go through. However after a minute or two of comparision, it became clear. I will say that if you choose to glue or tape, you’ll need to supply your own as the organizer does not come with any included. Assembling the product was not difficult but it did take awhile to finish. Overall I feel that the materials look very good and they are very sturdy too. I’m very pleased with everything.
9 out of 10

INSTRUCTION
In this section, I’d normally cover the rulebook of the game. Instead, I’ll go over the instructions that came with the insert. The instructions came on two sheets of double sided paper. There was a detail processs that walks you through each step of assembly. The instructions had some pictures that help reference the sheets of wood to use as well as showing you how each item should be put together. It wasn’t all that difficult to figure out how everything went together with these instructions. Everything was well written. Overall, I’m very pleased with the instructions and found them to be very helpful.
9 out of 10

CONSTRUCTION
In this section, I would normally be giving you my thoughts and feelings on the gameplay of whatever game it was that I reviewed. Instead, I’ll give you my thoughts and feelings on the assembly process of the insert along with any other tidbits of information that I feel are relevant. So, assembling this insert did take awhile. As you can see, there were a lot of pieces and a lot of trays to be assembled. I will say that if you’re familiar with some of the other organizers from Go7Gaming, then you’ll realize that the pieces are usually a little bit looser than those from other insert companies. It’s for this reason that I recommend using either glue or tape to hold everything together with. If you really want it to last, use glue. That’s all there is to it. Once you’ve gotten everything built and assembled, you’ve got to get it all put into the box. I recommend using the pictures from the website or from this review to place everything in the right place. I had to compare what I had versus what the website showed in the pictures to get everything pretty much where it went. As I mentioned earlier, I only had the base game with the Kickstarter extras and so I didn’t have any add ons like the extra monsters dice set or the adventurers miniature set. The insert does add a significant amount of weight to the box but it seems to increase the stability and strength too. The trays are great and they make setting up the game a lot quicker. Sometimes these types of inserts will cause bulging or other issues when the lid is closed. I didn’t notice anything like that with this one. Everything fits together nicely and looks good when it’s all put together. Overall I’m extremely happy with the look and functionality of the product. I would highly recommend this to anyone that has the base game and especially anyone that has either the Kickstarter version or plans to buy any of the add ons for the game. This is a great product and it is extremely helpful to have.
9 out of 10

OVERALL
The Go7Gaming MASM-001 Insert Kit for Masmorra: Dungeons of Arcadia is a great way to get your game organized. It has enough room for all the pieces of the base game as well as all the Kickstarter extras and the add ons. Assembling everything was too difficult, there are a lot of pieces and sheets of wood so figuring out exactly which ones to use did take a bit. The instructions are detailed and fairly simple to follow. I will say that with as many things that need to be assembled, it does take awhile to complete. In any event, the insert is great and it provides plenty of room for everything. Overall I’m thrilled with how nice it is and how well it fits everything inside the box. I highly recommed this insert. It’s amazing just like the people at Go7Gaming. You will be completely satisfied with both.
9 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great products, please check out Go7Gaming at their site.

http://go7gaming.com/

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ZooScape Review

ZooScape is a game by Hisashi Hayashi, published by Tasty Minstrel Games. It is for 3-6 players. In this game, players take on the role of zookeepers as they chase down escaped animals. They’ll be trying to round up the most points worth of animals and place them back in their cages without overcrowding them. In the end, the player that can prove they’re the best zookeeper will be declared the winner.

To begin, the Zoo cards are shuffled together. Cards from the Zoo deck are then dealt out to form 5 face down decks. The number of cards that are dealt out to each deck is based on the number of players. In a 4 player game, 10 cards are dealt to each deck. Any remaining cards are returned to the box. The Fish cards are placed in a stack in the center of the play area. Each player is given one First and one Second Zookeeper card. The first player is chosen and they are given the Zoo Manager, Clipboard and Zoo Gate cards. Play now begins.

The game is played over a series of 5 rounds. Each round is divided into 3 phases; splitting the cards, chasing animals and cleanup. The first phase is splitting the cards. In this phase, the Zoo Manager deals out all of the cards from the first of the 5 decks. Each card is dealt out face up into a single line in the middle of the play area. The line is created in the same order as the cards were dealt out. The order can not be changed. The Zoo Manager then splits the line into two groups by sliding the cards over and placing the Zoo Gate between the two groups. It should be noted that each group must have at least 1 card in it. The Zoo Manager then places the Clipboard card into one of the two groups at any point in the line.

The second phase is the chasing animals phase. In this phase, each player will use their Zookeeper card to secretly show which group of cards they would like to have. Each player will take one of their Zookeeper cards and hold it face down in front of themself. They will choose either their first Zookeeper card if they want the cards on the left of the gate, or the second Zookeeper card if they want the cards on the right. Once everyone is ready, the cards are revealed. If a single player is the only one to select one of the groups, that player will then take all of the cards in that group ending their participation in that round. If there were no players to select one of the groups, the cards in that group are placed under the Clipboard card. If more than one player selected the same group, then the group will need to be split again. The Zoo Manager hands the Zoo Manager card to the next player in turn order. If they received the Clipboard card, they will also hand it to the same player along with any cards that were under it. The new Zoo Manager will now split the group into two groups, following the same steps as described earlier. If they were given the Clipboard card, it is placed in the line as well. Like before, any players that haven’t received any cards will secretly select a group using the same technique. This continues until either all players have received a group of cards or the cards can’t be split into two groups of at least 1 card each. In this case, each player that did not receive any cards now receives a Fish card as a consolation prize. It should be noted that when a player receives cards, they are placed face up in front of them in individual groups. Some cards are animal cards and will provide points as long as the cage limit isn’t exceeded. In that case they will score negative points at the end of the game. Hunters also provide negative points. Veterinarians force a player to discard 2 of their animal cards. Wild Animals cause the player to draw a random card from the unused cards in the box adding it to their face up cards. Chameleons become a copy of whichever animal the player has the most of. Once everything has been placed and dealt with, the next phase begins.

The final phase is the cleanup phase. In this phase, the player that has the Clipboard will now receive all the cards that were placed under it from earlier. If there were no cards underneath the Clipboard card, the player receives a Fish card. They also receive the Zoo Manager card making them the Zoo Manager for the next round. If no other player received the Clipboard card, the cards beneath it remain there for the next round and the Zoo Manager card is passed to the next player in turn order, along with the Clipboard card and any cards beneath it. A new round now begins.

The game continues until 5 rounds have been played, using all 5 decks. Players add up their points and the player with the most points is the winner.

COMPONENTS
There are some really beautiful looking cards included with this game. The game comes with 74 Zoo cards which include all the different animals and the Veterinarians. There are also 10 Fish cards and 12 Zookeeper cards, as well as the Zoo Manager, Clipboard and Zoo Gate cards. These look amazing. I love the artistic look of each one. The huge splashes of color highlighting the head of each animal is absolutely gorgeous while the varied people on the cards look like a painting. I especially like all the different animals. I only wish that there had been a bit more variety. As it is there are no great apes like gorillas or orangutans. Neither are there any pandas or koalas. That’s a bit of a disappointment as my family loves them. The cards have a great linen style finish to them which keeps them from sticking together or causing problems while shuffling. I have to say that overall I’m really thrilled with how nice the cards look. I don’t think that most people will have any problem with the overall look and feel of these cards.
8 out of 10

RULEBOOK
The rulebook for this game is a huge double sided paper that folds up small enough to fit inside the box. It’s made of thicker material than just your average copy paper. It has some great looking pictures on it, some of which are examples of how the game is played. Every aspect of the game is covered quite well. All the different card types are explained in detail as well. The rules are easy to read and won’t take a long time either. Overall I think that the rules do a good job of conveying what you need to know to play the game in a quick and concise way. I have nothing to really complain about here.
8 out of 10

GAMEPLAY
This is a quick and fun game that is very simple to play. It’s easy enough that even younger players can play fairly easily. The few card icons aren’t that difficult to remember and shouldn’t pose a problem for most players. At it’s heart, it is merely a game of set collection. However it does help if you’re able to read your opponents by looking at what they already have in their zoo and then determining which group of cards they will go for. It helps you to be able to get the most cards at a time if you can do this just right. Although you will find that sometimes, what you want is in the group that you think they’ll go for too. So do you go for it and risk taking less cards if they also pick that group or do you go for what you think is the safe bet and go for the group you think they won’t take. Another thing you have to be aware of is not overloading your cages. Animals like the lions can only have 2 in their cage. If you wind up with 3 of them, well that’s a negative 3 points that you’ll wind up with at the end of the game unless you can get rid of one of them with a Veterinarian card. Overall I like the light fast gameplay of this one and find it to be a great little filler game. I think that fans of set collection games should enjoy this one, especially if they like a little luck thrown in for seasoning. Overall this is a nice little family card game that most players should enjoy. i would recommend it.
8 out of 10

OVERALL
ZooScape is a light weight card game of collecting animals that’s fun for the whole family. It’s not a very long game. Most game sessions can be played in around 20 minutes. The artwork on the cards is really beautiful. I love the artistic designs. However I do wish there had been a bit more animal types in the cards. I think that this is a great game for families. It’s simple enough that even younger players can play fairly easily. The few card icons shouldn’t be a real problem. I think that it’s light enough and fast enough that it makes a great filler game. It’s small enough that it’s pretty portable and can be played almost anywhere. I think that fans of set collection games should really enjoy this one, especially if they like a little bit of luck thrown in. Overall I rather enjoy the game and think it’s good fun for the whole family. I would recommend it. Now get out there and catch those animals.
8 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great games, please check out Tasty Minstrel Games at their site.

 http://playtmg.com

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Kanagawa Review

Kanagawa is a game by Bruno Cathala and Charles Chevallier, published by IELLO. It is for 2-4 players. In this game, players take on the role of a disciple of the greatest artist in Kanagawa, Master Hokusai. They will be following his teachings as they try to expand their studio and paint the most harmonious and beautiful print. They will be trying to gain diplomas in several different areas as they assign their brushes to the landscape. In the end, the player that can gain the most Harmony points will be declared the winner.

To begin, the School board is placed in the middle of the play area. The first player is chosen and is given the Grand Master and Assistant pawns. Each player is given a random Starting tile and 2 brush pawns, which are placed in front of themself. The Lesson cards are shuffled together and placed face down next to the board. The Diploma tiles are all sorted face up by color and then by Harmony value. They are placed in 2 rows above the board, with the Diplomas associated with Prints at the top and the Diplomas associated with Studios on the bottom. Once all this has been set up, play now begins.

The game is played over several rounds. Each round is divided into 3 steps; Follow the teachings of the Master, Broaden your knowledge or Put it into practice and New lesson. The first step is to Follow the teachings of the Master. In this step, the player with the Grand Master pawn will draw Lesson cards to be placed onto the first row of the School board. The number of cards drawn is dependent on the number of players. Some cards are placed face up and some are placed face down, depending on what the board shows. In a 4 player game, 4 cards are drawn with the third card placed face down.

The second step is to broaden your knowledge or put it into practice. Beginning with the first player and continuing in turn order, each player will decide which of the two they want to do. If they decide to broaden their knowledge, they will pass their turn and will not take any Lesson cards. It should be noted however that if there is only 1 player remaining at the beginning of this step, they must put their knowledge into practice. To put their knowledge into practice, the player will choose one of the columns of Lesson cards taking all the cards in the column. They will then continue their work. This involves either improving their studio or expanding their print. To improve their studio, the player will turn over the Lesson card and place it under the bottom half of their Starting tile. This will expand and improve their studio allowing the player to immediately use the effects on it. To expand their print, the player must be able to match the combinations of Brush and Landscape as shown on the card. Any brush that has not been placed in a player’s studio may be placed on any empty Landscape icon in their studio. Players can also move brushes to match the icons of the print using the corresponding icons in their studio. It should be noted that a player may split their cards between their Studio and their Print in any way they like. Once the player is done continuing their work, they may take any corresponding Diplomas. As long as the player’s print meets the requirements of one of the Diplomas, they must choose to either take the Diploma or leave it. If they take it, they will place it next to their Print. It should be noted that a player may only take one Diploma of each color. This means that they would not be able to take a higher value one later. If they leave the Diploma, they can try to take a higher value Diploma later once they meet the requirements for it. However, they will no longer be able to take the one that they left behind.

The third step is a new lesson. As long as their are still players that haven’t taken any Lesson cards, the first player will draw as many Lesson cards as there are players remaining. The new cards will be lined up below the cards that remain on the School board in either face up or face down position, depending on the space on the board. Once this has been completed, the players that remain will go back to step 2 and either broaden their knowledge or put it into practice. If any players decide to broaden their knowledge again, Lesson cards will then be added to the third row of the board in the same way. Once this third row is filled, any remaining players must put their knowledge into practice and take all the Lesson cards in a column. Once all the player have taken a column of Lesson cards, the round ends. The player with the Assistant pawn will now take the Grand Master pawn making them the first player for the next round.

The game continues until one of two conditions is met. If the last Lesson card is added to the School board, players that have yet to take a column of Lesson cards must choose a column in turn order. At the end of the round, the game ends and scoring occurs. The game can also end at the end of a round when a player has at least 11 cards in their Print. Players gain points for each Lesson card in their Print including their Starting tile. They also gain points for the longest sequence of indentical Seasons in their Print. They get points for Harmony icons on their Lesson cards and Diploma tiles subtracting any symbols that are crossed out. They will also gain points for having the Grand Master pawn. Each player will then add up their points and the one with the most Harmony points is the winner.

COMPONENTS
This is a really beautiful looking game. In a lot of ways the artistic look and feel of the game remind me of Tokaido. The Lesson cards in this one make me think of the Panorama cards in that one. I really like the serene beauty of this game. It comes with the Lesson cards that I just mentioned. These are are completely square and are more like the size of tile except they have the thickness of a card. The Starting tiles, Diploma tiles and Storm tokens are all thick cardboard. The Diplomas are brightly colored with different iconography on them. The Storm tokens fit in with the same artistic style as that of the Lesson cards. The Grand Master and Assistant pawns, as well as the brush pawns are all made of wood. These are very nice and fit in thematically well with the game. The School board is made of bamboo and rolls up like those old Chinese wall calendars that you used to be able to find all over the place. Honestly this is the only part of the game that I don’t like. I really wish the board had been just that, a board. Thematically it looks nice and fits in well, but functionally I feel like it isn’t that nice and looks like it will fall apart rather easily. As a matter of fact, my board already has some stray threads on the back of it that are just waiting to cause problems. That was just on opening the box. While I like the look and feel of the game, this one piece ruins my overall love for an otherwise great looking game.
7 out of 10

RULEBOOK
The rulebook for this game is designed very well. It walks you through the different steps and concepts of the game like a peaceful stroll through the park. There are lots of great looking pictures and examples throughout the book. Every aspect of the game, from the cards to the tiles, are explained in great detail. The book also has a nice section devoted to the explanation of each of the different Diploma tiles. There’s also a reminder of the different effects that each icon provides on the back page, as well as the structure of a round for reference. Overall, this book gives me that zen like feel that many of the components do. It’s really beautiful and a visual treat. I like it a lot.
9 out of 10

GAMEPLAY
As I’ve mentioned earlier, this has a really calm and peaceful, zen like feel to it. It’s not a difficult game to teach or play. It’s actually fairly simple. However there are some serious choices to make. Such as when to take a column from the School board and whether to use the cards on your Print or in your Studio. Knowing how to manipulate your brush pawns to be able to get the most out of them and to be able to pay for the Lesson cards is the key. Another major choice to make is do you go ahead and take the Diploma tile that you just met the requirements for, or do you hold out and hope that your opponents don’t keep you from getting the Lesson cards you need to be able to meet the next higher requirements. I know those types of choices sound stressful, but they’re not. As I’ve already said, the game gives me the same feelings that I get when I play Tokaido. I like how beatiful that your tableau looks in front of you at the end of the game. This is just a fun game that looks great. Fans of games like Tokaido or other artistic games should really enjoy the look and feel of this one. Worker placement and card drafting fans should also like this one. This is a game that I would recommend. Overall it’s a masterpiece that you can actually play.
9 out of 10

OVERALL
Kanagawa is a beautiful artistic game that allows players to bring out their inner artist. It doesn’t take a very long time to play. Most game sessions last around 45 minutes. The components are beautiful. I especially like the peaceful look and feel of the Lesson cards. I was a little disappointed in the board. I feel like the bamboo board, while it works with the theme, won’t hold up to a lot of play. I may be wrong, but that’s my thoughts on it anyway. The game itself is not only a visual treat but also a beauty of design. It combines elements of worker placement, card drafting and set collection. The game is a lot of fun and gives me that same zen like feel that I get when I play Tokaido. Fans of Tokaido or other artistic games should really enjoy this one. I also think fans of simple worker placement or card drafting games will like this one too. Overall, this is a game that I like, not only the theme and look of, but also the actual game itself. It’s very enjoyable. I would recommend this one. It’s a work of art.
8 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great games, please check out IELLO Games at their site.

www.iellogames.com

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The Lost Expedition Review

The Lost Expedition is a game by Peer Sylvester, published by Osprey Games. It is for 1-5 players. In this game, players will be leading a team of three explorers through the jungle to find the lost city of El Dorado. They will be following the path of renowned explorer Percy Fawcett as they try to survive the hazards and events that befall them on their adventure. They’ll need to use every bit of expertise they have to ration their resources and reach their goal. In the end, if the players are able to reach the lost city of Z, they will be declared the winners.

Before I get into the actual setup of the game, it should be noted that this game can be played in 3 different ways: solo, cooperative and head to head. In this review I will mainly be explaining the cooperative rules. However I will touch on both of the others in the gameplay section below.

To begin, one explorer of each Expertise should be placed on the table to form the team area. There should also be 3 Ammunition and 4 Food tokens placed in the team area. The remaining Ammunition and Food should be placed in separate supplies. The Adventure cards should be shuffled together and each player dealt 4 cards each. The deck should then be placed face down on the table. When playing with only 2 players, 6 cards are dealt instead. Players should decide on a difficulty level. For normal difficulty, 9 Expedition cards are then placed in a row in the middle of the play area. The lost city should be the last card. A pawn is then placed on the first expedition card at the opposite end of the lost city. The Morning/Evening token is placed on Morning and placed near the play area. The first player is chosen and is given the Expedition Leader token. Play now begins.

The game is played over a series of rounds. Each round represents a day of the expedition. Each round consists of 2 phases or hikes; Morning and Evening. The first phase or hike is the Morning hike. In this hike, the players in turn order will each place one card from their hand to the table in a single row. Once they have each placed one, they will then place a second one, again in turn order. Once each player has placed 2 cards, the played cards are then arranged in numerical order from lowest to highest. Players will then resolve each card one at a time in order from left to right. Cards will cause the players to either gain or lose resources or expertise by responding to the symbols in the boxes. Some boxes on the cards must be triggered, some only 1 box must be triggered and some are completely optional. Once the card is resolved, it’s discarded unless the player gains it due to an Expertise symbol. After all the cards have been resolved, the Morning token is flipped over to the Evening side. The team will now lose a food as the Explorers are forced to eat.

The second hike is the Evening hike. Players now follow the same routine as before by playing 2 cards from their hand one at a time. However, this time the cards remain in the order that they are played. Every time a card is played, it’s added to the right of the previously placed card. They will not be rearranged like they are during the Morning phase. Once again, the cards are resolved just like during the Morning hike. Once all the cards have been resolved, the Evening token is flipped back over to the Morning side. The team now loses an additional food to feed the Explorers.

Once the round is over, the Expedition Leader token is passed to the next player in turn order. Players will then draw 4 cards from the Adventure deck. If the deck is empty, the players will lose a food from the team supply. The discard pile is then shuffled to create a new deck.

It should be noted that during the game if the team needs to spend a food and there are none remaining in the team supply, one of the Explorers must lose a health. If the team is forced to spend Expertise, they can either discard a card from their team area with the matching symbol, lose a health from an Explorer with the matching Expertise symbol or lose 2 health from an Explorer without the matching Expertise symbol.

The game continues until 1 of 3 different things happens. If the pawn makes it to the lost city of Z card, the players win. If all 3 of the explorers die, the game ends and the players lose. If the Adventure deck runs out for a second time, the players lose.

COMPONENTS
This is a great looking game. First off there is a huge stack of tarot sized cards. There are cards for the 6 different explorers, including one that looks amazingly like Teddy Roosevelt. There are cards for the Expedition to the lost city of Z. There are cards that shape the adventure. This of course is the largest pile of cards and is where the actual game play comes in at. Each card has some amazingly looking comic book style artwork that I simply love. I like how that each card gives a real feel of the actual story that you’re kind of writing as you play the game. The cards have a very glossy finish making it a bit hard to shuffle. I kind of wish they had been linen finished or something of that nature to make things a bit easier and to keep them from sticking together. There’s also several cardboard tokens. There are tokens for health, food and ammunition, as well as for the Expedition Leader and the Morning/Evening. These are a little bland looking but they match up with the icons on the cards without being overly distracting. With that in mind, I think it makes sense and is completely understandable. The game also comes with 2 wooden meeples and a couple of player aid cards. The meeples are brightly colored and look great. The player aids are very helpful when playing the game and are great to have. For me, I like how well everything comes together and looks when it’s laid out on the table. Overall, I love the look and feel. I just wish the execution had been a bit better.
8 out of 10

RULEBOOK
The rulebook for this game is well designed. I like that the book has a page for the Designer’s notes where he explains his inspiration and notes on how the game came about. The book has lots of great pictures and examples throughout. Everything about the game, cards, and icons are explained in great detail, as well as the different phases of gameplay. As I mentioned at the beginning of this review, the book has 3 different sets of rules which I’ll cover in just a bit. There’s a page for clarifying a few different items and a page about the explorers in the game. The back cover is yet another player aid with rules to remember and explanations for the different icons on the cards. Overall, the book does a really good job of covering everything in an easy to read and easy to understand way. I like the look and feel of it and think that the designer did an excellent job with it. I’m very pleased with the book.
9 out of 10

GAMEPLAY
This is an amazingly fun game to play. I really like the sense of adventure and excitement you feel as you work your way through the jungle to the lost city. Every card can spell your doom or can provide you with the resources you need to be able to keep going. I like how that there are so many choices to be made. Sometimes your choosing the lesser of 2 or even 3 evils, while other times it’s all about making the best choice of what you’ll gain. Basically as you play the game you’re trying to best use the resources that you have at hand and survive the different obstacles and hazards along the way. All while trying to move your pawn forward on the path. It’s not a difficult concept to grasp. What is difficult is just how challenging this game is. It can be quite tough, even on the easier difficulty setting. I like how that the story kind of comes out as you play the game and each time you play the story changes. This one reminds me of those Indiana Jones movies and makes me want to play it more and more. I mentioned earlier that there are several different sets of rules for how the game can be played. I’ve already discussed the cooperative rules. The solo rules are much like the co-op rules except that instead of another player adding cards to the line, you’re drawing them from the deck to add them. During the Evening hike you have to choose when to draw cards and when to play cards from your hand. Other than that, the rules are pretty much the same. Head to Head is even more different. In this version the players add cards to one of 2 paths. In the Morning hike, the leader gets to choose which path to take, while in the Evening hike the other player chooses first. In this version, it’s all about making things difficult on the other player without making it so bad that they completely mess you over in the second phase. The first player to reach the city wins. They also win if the other player’s explorers die off first. I have to say that I quite like the solo challenge. It’s a lot of fun and makes me think of the game Friday. I’m not as keen on the head to head version. I honestly prefer to play the game co-op. To me it just makes more sense and feels better thematically to me. I like working with other players to best survive the jungle as opposed to turning it into a game of take that. Overall I think fans of games like Friday or Robinson Crusoe should enjoy the co-op and solo versions of this game. Take that card game fans might enjoy the head to head challenge. For me, I really like solo and co-op. I love the stories that are made as I play the game. It’s one that I would definitely recommend.
9 out of 10

OVERALL
The Lost Expedition is a game of exploration and adventure that can be played in 3 different ways. The game isn’t very long. Most game sessions last around 30-45 minutes. The game looks great. The artwork on the cards is amazing. I like the comic book style designs. The tokens are a little bland but they work with the iconography of the cards. I also wish the cards had been linen finished to make them easier to shuffle. The rulebook is great and is very thorough on explaining how to play the game in 3 different ways. I really like the solo and co-op versions of the game. I feel the head to head feels a bit too much like a take that style card game and I’m not overly fond of it. The game provides a lot of adventure and fun packed in this box. Fans of adventure games like Friday or Robinson Crusoe should definitely enjoy this one. Take that fans might enjoy the head to head variant. Overall this is a great game that I would definitely recommend. Search and Rescue party not included.
9 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great games, please check out Osprey Games at their site.

https://ospreypublishing.com/store/osprey-games/

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Sticky Chameleons Review

Sticky Chameleons is a game by Théo Rivière, published by IELLO. It is for 2-5 players. In this game, players will take on the role of a hungry chameleon. They will be competing to fill their empty bellies with the tastiest and juiciest bugs that happen by. Of course they’ll have to be careful that they don’t get stung by a wasp or get their tongue tangled up with another chameleons. In the end, the player that can collect 5 Yummy tokens first will not only have a full belly, but also be declared the winner.

To begin, all the insect and wasp tokens should be randomly placed all over the table without overlapping each other. The Yummy tokens should be placed separate from the insects, but where every player can reach them. Each player is given a sticky tongue. The first player is chosen and is given the Insect and Color dice. Play now begins.

The game is played over several rounds. Each round is made up of 2 phases; observation and meal. The first phase is the observation phase. In this phase, the player with the dice rolls them on the table. The Insect die will show which insect the players should try and catch, while the Color die shows which color of insect to catch. For example, a purple praying mantis or a green catterpillar. Once this is determined the next phase begins.

The next phase is the meal phase. In this phase, players will simultaneously try to catch the insect, that was determined to be the yummiest one, with their sticky tongue. It should be noted that players can not use anything except their sticky tongue to catch an insect with. Once an insect is caught, the player can remove it with their hand, returning it back to the table. Any other insects or wasps that a player happens to get stuck to their sticky tongue can not be touched until the end of the round. However the player is allowed to shake their tongue to make them fall off. Also of note, other players may still try to take the yummiest insect as long as it’s not been returned to the table. This includes using their sticky tongue to try to snatch it from off of another player’s sticky tongue. Once a player places the yummiest insect token back onto the table, the round ends. The player then collects a Yummy token and takes control of the dice. However If the player had a wasp on their sticky tongue at any time, they do not gain a Yummy token. Players will then return any insects or wasps that they caught back to the table. A new round will then begin.

The game continues with players trying to catch the yummiest insect so that they can collect Yummy tokens. Once a player gains their fifth Yummy token, the game ends. That player is the winner.

COMPONENTS
This game comes with some very cute and silly looking pieces. The sticky tongues are some kind of sticky rubbery substance and will stick to anything. It kind of reminds me of the same substance those wall walkers and spiders were made out of. You could throw those things on the wall and they’d stick. It was the weirdest thing. I think this is the same stuff. The game also comes with several tokens. There are the yummy tokens which are fairly thick cardboard. These have chameleon head with a crown on it. They’re pretty darn cute. The insect and wasp tokens are all quite a bit thinner but are still made of cardboard. These look cute and silly. I especially like the silly face that the caterpillar makes. I’m guessing that these are thinner so that they won’t be too heavy to stick to the tongues. Finally there are 2 dice. Both dice are white. One has different colors on it and the other has shadow images of the different bugs to be eaten. Everything in the box is super cute and silly looking. I quite like the different pieces, especially the insects. Even my daughter enjoys the silliness of the insects. She does think the sticky tongues are kind of gross though. She said it’s like slime. Slime or not, it’s definitely sticky. Overall the pieces are good quality and are fun.
8 out of 10

RULEBOOK
The rulebook for this one isn’t all that long and is pretty well straight forward and simple. There’s nothing difficult in it to understand at all. It’s very easy to read. There are lots of pictures and examples of gameplay throughout the book. There’s a great picture of how to set up the game that I really like. Everything detail is covered. The book looks good and doesn’t take long to read. Overall there’s nothing to complain about. It’s well designed and gets the job done.
8 out of 10

GAMEPLAY
This isn’t a hard game but it does require a bit of aim and some good reflexes. Both of which I don’t have. Even though some of the pieces are quite large, I still have trouble getting my aim just right. I’ve tried flicking the thing like a sling shot and even throwing it like a rope. Seems the easiest thing is to just lower it down from above. Of course by that time, my daughter has already Wonder Womaned the thing and snatched it up before I can get to it. Needless to say I don’t win very often. I will say though that the game is rather silly and fun. I can’t tell you at the times that we’ve laughed while playing the game. This is a nice family game that gets everyone up from the table and makes them actually work for the win. I’m not usually a big fan of dexterity games. Mainly because I’m not all that good with them. I’m not good with this one either but I do find the humor and laughter that this game brings to be a breath of fresh air. This is one that the entire family can play. You might even be able to get Grandma and Grandpa to give it a try. Nothing better than watching the little ones completely own their elders. This game will definitely make you laugh. It kind of reminds me of the frantic fun that you have while playing Hungry Hungry Hippos, just not as loud. I think families with younger kids will definitely enjoy this one. I would recommend giving it a try. It’s silly fun.
8 out of 10

OVERALL
Sticky Chameleons is a light weight family friendly dexterity game that everyone can enjoy. It’s a very fast game to play. Most game sessions last around 10-15 minutes. The artwork and pieces included with the game are very good. I especially like the silly look of the different insects, as does my daughter. It does take a little bit of skill and patience to be able to use the sticky tongues. That shouldn’t deter those of us with bad reflexes though as a lot of fun and laughter can be had very easily with this one. Fans of dexterity games, especially families with younger kids, will definitely enjoy this one. This is a great family friendly game that everyone can enjoy. I would definitely recommend giving it a try. Stick with me, it’s a lot of fun.
8 out of 10

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For more information about this and other great games, please check out IELLO Games at their site.

www.iellogames.com

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